Saturday, 9 November 2013

Condescending Piousness



Every so often FaceBook brings to my attention social issues that, if it weren't for this expansive forum, would likely go unnoticed.

This morning I stumbled across a post that almost brought a tear to my eye. It re-affirms my belief that humanity is on the right track and that the spirit of fraternity and benevolence amplifies with each new generation.

I know that for many years religious institutions, in particular Christian organisations, have helped feed and clothe the poor - but I have always detected a certain air of arrogance and condescending piousness from those dispensing aid that I dislike immensely. An "I am holier and wealthier than thou, and don't forget it" kind of attitude.

There is no condescending attitude with the Italian idea of "Suspended Coffee", for the simple reason it has no ulterior motive such as ingratiation.


The "Suspended Coffee" idea is based on an Italian goodwill tradition of those who can spare the cost of extra coffees when ordering theirs. Pre-paying.  An idea that is now spreading around Europe with more and more Cafes joining the scheme.

It was brought to my attention by a chap who was visiting his pal in Belgium. He noticed some people going to the counter to order their coffee and asking for two or more "suspended" ones. When he enquired of his friend what that was all about his pal said "wait and see".

Some time later a dishevelled and likely homeless old boy walked in and politely asked if he could have a "suspended" coffee. The waitress promptly served him the hot and comforting beverage that no doubt makes a huge difference to this destitute man's quality of life.

The dispensers of charity in this case remain anonymous and the recipients don't feel compelled or obligated to thank the donors. Genuine charity. I like that.



 I like that a heck of a lot.

:)

10 comments:

  1. It is indeed a good way of helping others - as long as those who ask for suspended coffees are genuinely poor rather than just cheap!

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    1. I'd hate to think that the wrong people may take advantage, GB, but some are capable of stooping that low

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  2. If you're going to put my picture on your blog, I'm going to have to quit passing myself as destitute.

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    1. hahaha, if that's you Snow you're a master of disguise :)

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  3. But don't forget the religious who supply those turkeys once a year during the "season to be kind". It's not as if they have to eat the other 363 days.

    America wastes too much food, and good food, at the end of the day as it's hauled to the dumpsters behind restaurants.

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    1. LJ, indeed, it's as if the poor only need to eat in the festive season - tipycal hypocrisy of the pious. As for the food wasted, it is a tragic state of affairs. Recent surveys in the UK reveal families (never mind supermarkets and restaurants) waste/dump the equivalent £60 or 100$ worth of food per week :(

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  4. It's a great scheme...but I tremble at the thought that somewhere someone will take advantage of it, spoiling it for everyone...

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    1. One can only hope it doesn't happen, but...

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  5. A great idea but out here in the bush we dont seem to have homeless people... When I visit the states capital they are everywhere begging for your 'spare' change with a certain smell that tells of alcohol abuse...I wont give to these people and help feed their addiction but genuine homeless people will always get my attention.

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